• Top 10 most inspiring Indigenous Instagrammers

    The beauty of being proud of your roots is just priceless and more importantly if one is indigenous. We have curated a list of indigenous instagrammers to introduce you to successful and talented individuals representing various indigenous communities around the world.

    Nikki Pitre (@Nikkipitre)

    Nikki is a devoted advocate of Native American education. She aims to improve the future of Native American youth by her leadership in the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools and the American Indian Higher Education consortium. In her feed (@Nikkipitre), Nikki is devoted advocate of Native American education. She aims to improve the future of Native American youth by her leadership in the National Association of Federally Impacted Schools and the American Indian Higher Education consortium.

    Thosh Collins (@Thoshographer)

    Tosh is a photographer who is focused on creating consciousness on global issues through photos that depict the cultural identity of indigenous people. He is the founder of “Well For Culture”, which is a community that brings together indigenous genius minds.

    Shannon Michelle (@Native.yogini)

    Michelle is Mohawk and she is all about Yoga and wellness. She combines the healing process with a profound connection to native wisdom

    Waylon Pahona (@Pahona52)

    When we think of courage, Waylon certainly represents it. Coming from a negative, past Waylon has successfully overcome obstacles and rippled his positivity on young generations. His feed is truly unique and full of encouraging mottos to live by.

    Tisha (@Indigenousfoodrevolutionary)

    Tisha wins our heart with her passion for traditions. The one that stands out the most is the “Native Paleo food.” A revolution, as she calls it, is documented in a blog that focuses solely on food as a sacred heritage.

    Jacob Pratt (@Jake_Dakota)

    Jacob is an entrepreneur and youth advocate. Since 2012, he has been committed to helping indigenous youth realize their potential through Wambdu Dance.

    Acosia Red Elk (@Redelk42)

    Acosia is known as the rock star of Pow wow– a Native Americans’ way of meeting together. She is a self-taught dancer and since 1998 she’s danced professionally. She represented her Umatilla people, the Sahaptin speaking tribe, in various competitions where she won five world championships.

    Daniel Anunnaki (@daniel.mood)

    An aspiring photographer portraying the indigenous identity of “his Aymara community.” Most of the pictures illustrate his passion for Aymara traditional heritage.

    Indigenous power couple Sunny Red Bear and Raynor Whitcombe
    Sunny Red Bear (@SunnyRedBear-Whitcombe)

    She has been deeply rooted in her culture as an advocate of native women. She believes that, “survivors will continue to heal for the rest of their lives, because healing is not a destination, it’s a life-long process.” She is interested in pursuing a degree that focuses on policy changes for Native women

    Raynor Whitcombe (@Kingaden88)

    Native Samoan, Raynor once realized that the obesity rates in his country are terrifying. He started working with his community members as a personal trainer to inspire his people to live fit and influence the entire fitness culture.

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